No more app failures: Protecting my brand in mobile.

The impact of not taking care of your assets properly - protecting my brand in mobile

The last blog was all about the Power of Mobile Apps for Enterprise. Now we are going to look at the impact of not taking care of your assets properly.

"Over half of millennials will turn their back on a brand if they have a poor mobile app experience with them, according to research from Oracle." - MYcustomer.com (source: Oracle)

And 47% of customers will switch to your competition if the app doesn't work. (Source: asmartplanet.com | Img. credit: IBM)

Ok, so, surprise, surprise the thing has to work. 

But lets assume you did a good job of actually building the app. Have you got it on the right app stores and are you promoting it properly? If you have then what is going wrong and why didn’t you get the ROI you were looking for?

First of all it helps to make sure that you have set your targets correctly. Do you really need to be counting downloads? If you look at the app above although with our modeling and publicly available data we calculate that it had less than a couple of hundred downloads, they were getting about 30 people returning monthly which is a very high engagement percentage and, dependent upon their objectives, they could be getting a good ROI from those customers. 

This one isn't bad looking but didn’t had more than a handful of downloads in the last year. Expensive.

But don’t worry even the best have got it wrong occasionally but they learn and they learn fast.

“I'm not alone in hating Podcasts: Nearly 4,000 reviewers in the App Store rated it 1.5 stars on average. That's a pretty blistering indictment” - Rick Broida @cheapskateblog. Click here for the article.

We recently reviewed an app that had 1000s of negative ratings. Bad news right. Well actually, in spite of getting only 1.5 stars on average the reviews all made recommendations on how it could be improved. Often when that many people get on board its because they want it, they just want it better. That app, a fan app for engineers is now 3.5 stars and has over 100,000 users monthly. Not too shabby.

So its not just focusing on "how to build a successful mobile app" but also listening to your mobile app users. In the below example the average rating across all apps in the category was 3.4. This one had a rating of 1.0 with zero interaction for 4 weeks. This should have been cause for serious concern with the relevant stakeholders.

Upon reading the app reviews, the rating below was caused by an easy-to-fix bug which was preventing people from logging in. The oversight resulted in terrible user reviews, uninstalls, and brand damage.

So how do these problems arise in enterprises and what can you do about it?

A lot of large organisations have no idea how many apps they really have across their different divisions, countries or deparments. Typically the marketing or digital department has struggled to find internal resources to support an app so they have done it themselves.

As additional departments start to roll out apps too the problems escalate.

That leads to a highly fragmented approach to mobile. And it becomes apparent very quickly.

Do these are reflect the same brand guidelines do you think?

 I don’t want to pick on Siemens as they have some great apps too.

And they aren’t alone, I mean who commissioned these apps? How are they performing? Are they in line with corporate identity policy? And have you even got best practices in the organization?

Do you think most of these are developed by Coca Cola? Do you even want to hazard a guess. Even the publisher name won't make it any clearer as its quite common that the developers name appers rather than the brand so you still can't tell if it was done by the brand or not. 

Even companies that are rolling out apps fast and furiously aren’t able to benefit from the experience they have from others within the company. And they don't have all their assets stored in one place. They don’t know what metrics to track and see beyond the usual app store analytics. They don’t know how to choose the right developer, and they aren’t storing all of the assets and passwords to avoid reinventing the wheel the next time round.

You shouldn't really be going into mobile thinking "How can I prevent brand damage in mobile? but once you get started it is important that you set out guidelines across your organisation to help you do it well. Mobile relationship management tools can help you keep on top of things. 

Want to find out how many apps your really have in your portfolio? 

See what the AppBoard can do for you

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